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Facebook Spawns New Ventures


Betaflow Review/Posted by Admin

In the years after Google was founded, it’s former employees left and established some of the most successful online companies in the market today. Similarly, Paypal is a company that seemed to inspire and train Internet genius, with alumni going on to form a number of important online ventures. Now, the alumni of facebook are attracting the same sort of attention from Silicon Valley investors.

On Monday, Quora, a start-up founded by four ex-Facebook employees, including former Chief Technology Officer Adam D’Angelo, raised a Series A round of funding from Benchmark Capital that the technology blog TechCrunch said valued the company at $86 million, citing an unnamed source.

I am always so fascinated with the webs of creation that come from the success of one company. It will be interesting to see how many people leave facebook in order to create new, successful, online ventures of their own. As far as I’m concerned, it is a hallmark of success–a badge of honor that facebook should be proud of.

Guy Buys Coke ($8.1 million worth)


Betaflow Review/Posted by Admin

The economy, still in the dump, is mostly holding the line in recent months, neither improving nor falling dramatically. This does not mean we are in the midst of recovery or that the recession is going to get worst–it simply means things are staying bad.

Still, in the midst of that situation, some people are finding reason to be optimistic and make risky moves.

Shares of Coca Cola slumped after the company announced it would be buying part of its largest bottler. But at least one savvy insider has taken the decline as a chance to stock up on $8.1 million in Coca-Cola shares.

Herbert A. Allen, a director at Coca-Cola, bought 152,080 shares for an average price of $52.95 on March 1. The shares were purchased by Allen’s New York-based private-investment firm Allen & Co.

Allen is a smart guy, buying shares of Coke at a low-time so that he’ll profit long time. The old adage is “Buy Low, Sell High.”